Course Syllabus

Syllabus: AP Computer Science A
Mr. Cummins 2016-2017

Materials

Each student is responsible for storing code, reports, etc. on their student drive in class. It is not my responsibility if a student cannot access necessary files due to someone in the group being absent or if files are needed to complete assignments outside of class. I suggest utilizing online file storage as well as saving backup copies on removable media (USB drive, etc.) in case of internet access being unavailable.

Homework

Homework is usually emailed to me; no printouts are required of students. Homework assignments are from the text, handouts in class, and from previous AP Exam questions. Students must do their own work. A rule of thumb is that they are free to offer verbal suggestions but should not share code.

Lab Component

At least 75% of classwork will involve students programming computers (as opposed to research papers, presentations, etc).  Lab work is extremely important for two reasons. First, it allows me to see students’ coding in action – to check for understanding while in progress, rather than just seeing a finished product. This instant feedback enables a student to make corrections “on the spot” much as a piano teacher helps guide new players in their formative years. Second, students can ask specific questions about concepts with which they are having trouble, and I can give personalized assistance. This is especially helpful during the first month of class, when students are new to programming, as well as during the weeks leading up to their first long-term project. In all cases, students are introduced to the AP Java subset.

Projects

Throughout the semester there will be large-scale projects that students implement and develop according to strict sets of guidelines. These projects are similar to the requirements a client might provide to our budding computer scientists and will provide significant experiences for their development. Students must make design decisions (which files to create, which files must or should interact with other files, and so forth). As students continue to learn, they will learn to create well-designed and organized projects completed in a fraction of the time it took at the beginning of the year. A more significant project will be given at the end of the year, which students will work on as a review for the AP Exam, with project presentations done after the exam. This will help keep students (especially seniors) on task after the AP Exam. Each student will have one full period to present their project.

Tests 

Open-book tests are given after each major topic is covered. Students are given a problem statement, similar to the homework assignments, and are asked to write a working program. They have the entire period to design, code, and debug their program. At the end of the period, I collect and grade each student’s program. An inherent and intentional part of this assessment is the student’s problem solving capability: what they can creatively develop in a scheduled time frame. Students are to fully document any borrowed code (excluding from the textbook) consistent with the principles of full disclosure and honesty. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action for academic dishonesty.

Absences

Students who miss a test due to excused absence will have a make-up test covering the same topics. As tests are individual case studies, it is possible that the make-up exam will be of a different difficulty level than the original. Tests missed due to unexcused absence may be penalized or not accepted for credit.

Extra Help / Credit

If you are having difficulty with anything in this course, please see me as soon as you feel that you have a problem. I want you to succeed and will try my best to help you. I am generally available before and after school to offer help. Performance challenges will be given in most units to provide an opportunity for additional credit. If a student elects not to participate in these challenges, they have elected to receive the grade they earn by their work.

Rules

Laws and rules are designed to protect the rights of others while ensuring maximum possible freedom. These rules are here to create a superior learning environment for every student. Instead of listing prohibited behaviors, I am giving a list of principles and expect you to govern yourself appropriately.

• Everyone should be listening to the speaker (whether student or teacher) without talking. If you have a question or comment that you would like to share, raise your hand and wait to be called on. Show respect both to your teacher and fellow classmates, including avoiding profanity.

• Conduct yourself in an appropriate manner at all times. Please bring all materials to class daily. Cheating (defined as using any form of others’ work without proper attribution) robs you of learning and will not be tolerated in any form.

• Technology should be used appropriately, as stated in the district Acceptable Use Policy. Using computers or personal devices for non-educational purposes is off limits. To protect the computers and other equipment in my room, no food, drink (except water), or gum will be allowed during class except for special occasions determined by Mr.Cummins and/or the administration.

Discipline Policy

Warning, loss of classroom privileges, detention, calling parents, or referring to office will be used as discipline measures.  The nature of the discipline will depend on the nature of the problem.

Acknowledgement

Please take the time to read this guide.  If you have any questions or concerns about your child's performance, feel free to contact me at patrick.cummins@bexleyschools.org. 

 

Syllabus is adjustable

 

AP Computer Science 2016/2017

Curriculum Map and Pacing Guide

 

   

Unit

Quarter 1  (40 days)

Dates

# Days

1

Introduction  (course materials etc. and computer dissemble)

 

8/17-8/19

3

2

Green Foot  - Oracle Notes

 

8/22-8/26

5

3

Java Basics / Output / Variables / Data Types (0a.,0b,0c)

 

8/29-9/9

10

4

 

OOP Basics / Instant Variables / Methods (02,03,04)

9/12-9/23

10

5

Decisions / If / Else If / Switch / For /While /          do-while (6,7,8,9)

 

9/26-10/14

12

 

 

Unit

Quarter 2 (44)

Dates

# Days

 

AP Magpie Lab (String Manipulation)

 

10/17-10/21

5

6

Booleans

 

10/24-10/28

5

7

 

Iterations / Loops / For / While / Do-While / Switch

 

10/31-11/18

13

8

Scanner / Chopper / Files

 

11/21-11/23

 3

9

Arrays / Basic Searching and Sorting (AP MC – FRQ)

 

11/28-12/9

10

10

Searching and Sorting

 

12/12-12/16

5

 

Semester 1 Exam Review and Exam

 

12/19-12/21

3

 

AP Picture Lab (Practice with Arrays) Homework over Break

 

 

 

Unit

Quarter 3 (52 days)

Dates

# Days

 

Review of Picture Lab

 

1/3-1/4

2

11

 

Array Lists (16)

1/5-1/20

11

12

Advanced OOP / Overloading Methods,

Advanced Parameter Passing,                                List of References( 17,18)

 

 

1/23-2/10

15

13

Interfaces (19)

 

2/6-2/10

5

14

Inheritance(20)

 

2/13-2/22

7

15

Abstract(21)

 

2/23-3/3

7

16

Matrices(22)

 

3/6-3/17

10

 

Unit

Quarter 4 (44 days) -4

Dates

# Days

17

 Recursion(23)

 

3/27-3/31

5

 

AP Elevens Lab

 

4/3-4/13

9

 

       AP Preparation and Review  (May 2nd 2017)

 

4/17-5/1

11

 

End of Year Projects

-          Intro to Graphics

-          The last Star Fighter

5/8-5/26

15

 

 

8/22/2016 H.W Download jGrasp on home computers and review chapter 1 Java Software Solutions.

 

 

Course Summary:

Date Details